Kinesthetics in Movement PDF Print E-mail

Dynamic movement is inextricably linked to successful sports performance. Different types of movement need to be performed at different speeds, at different angles and with minimal risk of injury. This article aims to show the fundamental biomechanics of the body and the specific muscle group dysfunction that can cause muscle imbalances, which in turn can lead to uncoordinated  and compromised muscle action.

Tennis players for example are known to have poor hip flexibility which can reduce pelvic control and lead to lower back stress. Also poor scapula stabilisation and tight pectorals and internal rotators can inhibit efficient stroke production and cause overuse injuries in the shoulder joint.

The following article the common problems associated with specific areas of the body and the resulting kinesthetic muscle imbalance.
 


BACK 
 

Tight

Weak

Asymmetrical Weight Shifting

Gastroc

Soleus

Bicep Femoris

Adductors

Iliopsoas

Piriformis

IT Band

Glute Medius

Glute Maximus

Transversus Abdominus

Multifidius

Lumbar Flexion

External Oblique

Rectus Abdominus

Hamstrings

Glute Medius

Glute Maximus

Transversus Abdominus

Multifidius

 

Lumbar Extension

Iliopsoas

Rectus Femoris

Erector Spinae

Latissimus Dorsi

Glute Medius

Glute Maximus

Transversus Abdominus

Multifidius

 

 
LOWER BODY
 

 Tight

Weak

Feet Flatten

Gastroc

Peroneals

Glute Medius

Anterior Tibialis

Posterier Tibialis

Feet Externally Rotated

Soleus

Bicep Femoris

Piriformis

Glute Medius

Knees Adduct

Adductors

IT Band

Glute Medius

Glute Maximus

Knees Abduct

Bicep Femoris

Iliopsoas

Piriformis

Glute Medius

Glute Maximus

 

 
UPPER BODY
 

 Tight

Weak

Arms Forward When Overhead

Latissimus Dorsi

Pectoralis Major

Mid/Lower Trapezius

Shoulder Blade Abducted

Upper Trap

Levator Scapulae

Pectoralis Major/Minor

Rhomboids

Mid/Lower Trapezius

Shoulder Blade Protracted

Latissimus Dorsi

Pectoralis Major/Minor

Rhomboids

Mid/Lower Trapezius

Teres Minor

Infra Spinatus

Shoulder Blade Elevated (Winging)

Upper Trapezius

Levator Scapulae

Lower Trapezius

By Jez Green BSc
 

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